Alex Gangitano

Exit Interview: Rep. Scott Rigell
Virginia Republican says leverage recess to pass appropriations bills on time

In January, 26 House members will not be returning to Congress. Some of them will return to their home districts for good while some will stay on in Washington for other jobs or to pursue another office. HOH asked several of them to reflect on their political careers and offer some advice and insight for the future.

Virginia Republican Rep. Scott Rigell, 56, was first elected in 2010. He announced in January that he will retire at the end of this congressional term, his third.

Koch Brothers-Backed Ad Hits Strickland With Clinton
Clinton's stance on coal mining an issue in Ohio Senate race

A new ad from the Freedom Partners Action Fund, backed by the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch, hits Ohio Democratic Senate candidate Ted Strickland with remarks his party's presidential nominee made about coal mining.

The ad opens with a coal miner, identified as Josh W. from Cadiz, Ohio, at work with other miners.

TMI, Chris Murphy
Connecticut senator is a fan of 'Fight Song' and Nick Lachey

Sen. Christopher S. Murphy opened himself up to criticism by admitting he might not be the best judge of music.

On Tuesday morning, the Connecticut Democrat defended Rachel Platten's "Fight Song," which has been widely used by the Hillary Clinton campaign over the past year, saying that he liked it "a lot."

Exit Interview: Rep. Reid Ribble
Wisconsin Republican says committees should select their own chairmen

In January, 26 House members will not be returning to Congress. Some of them will return to their home districts for good while some will stay on in Washington for other jobs or to pursue another office. HOH asked several of them to reflect on their political careers and offer some advice and insight for the future.

Wisconsin Republican Reid Ribble, 60, was first elected in 2010. He announced in January that he will retire at the end of this term, his third in Congress.

Trivia Tuesday: Presidential Golfers
How well do you know Obama's predecessors?

For this week's recess trivia, we're looking back on presidents who golf in honor of the end of President Barack Obama's last in-office August vacation.

Which president was considered the first serious golfer? 

Exit Interview: Rep. Randy Neugebauer
Retiring Texas Republican says Congress needs more conservatives

In January, 26 House members will not be returning to Congress. Some of them will return to their home districts for good while some will stay on in Washington for other jobs or to pursue another office. HOH asked several of them to reflect on their political careers and offer some advice and insight for the future.

Texas Republican Rep. Randy Neugebauer, 66, was first elected in 2003. He announced in September that he will retire at the end of this term, his sixth full one in Congress.

Exit Interviews: Retiring House Members
6 retiring members of Congress share what they learned and offer advice

Come January, 26 House members will not be returning to Congress. Some of them will return to their home districts for good while some will stay on in Washington for other jobs or to pursue another office.

HOH asked several retiring members to reflect on their political careers and offer some advice and insight for the future.

What Do Montana Senators Give Each Other For Their Birthdays?

This weekend, both Montana senators – Republican Steve Daines and Democrat Jon Tester – are celebrating their birthdays.

The neighboring dates gave the senators the opportunity to wish one another a happy birthday and exchange very Montana gifts.

How Do You Say Happy Birthday in Montana?
Montana Sens. Daines and Tester exchange very Montana birthday gifts

This weekend, both Montana senators — Republican Steve Daines and Democrat Jon Tester — are celebrating their birthdays. 

Daines on Saturday. Tester on Sunday.

Bill Clinton Turns 70
Former president and possible future first spouse celebrates

Former president and possible future first first man Bill Clinton celebrates his 70th birthday on Friday and we hope it's full of balloons. 

He’s about one year older than his wife, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, who will turn 69 in October.

First Trump TV Ads Air in Battleground States
Ad buy hits Clinton on the 'rigged' system

Donald Trump's campaign launched its first general election TV ad on Friday in battleground states where the Republican nominee trails Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, hitting her for a "rigged" system. 

The commercial will run in Florida, Ohio, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania until Aug. 29, NBC News reported.

'Believe it or Not,' Trump Has 'Regret'
"Particularly where it may have caused personal pain"

Donald Trump stepped out of character at a rally Thursday night when he admitted regret over certain comments he's made during his presidential campaign.

“Choose the right words or you say the wrong thing. I have done that. And believe it or not, I regret it,” he told a rally in Charlotte, North Carolina, The Associated Press reported.

Ex-Cantor Chief Takes Over as Interim Fairfax Mayor After Previous Mayor's Arrest
Steven Stombres will serve until a February special election in Fairfax

The former chief of staff to Eric Cantor was sworn in Wednesday as interim mayor for the city of Fairfax, Virginia, after the former mayor resigned amid a drug scandal.

Steven Stombres was voted unanimously to the post by the city council on Tuesday night to replace R. Scott Silverthorne, who was arrested for allegedly distributing and possessing methamphetamine.

Who is Marcus Garvey? And Should His Name Be Cleared?
On his 129th birthday, his family wants a posthumous presidential pardon

Jamaican political leader Marcus Garvey inspired a Pan-Africa philosophy known as Garveyism that sought to empower people of African descent. 

The controversial figure founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association in 1914 and organized a shipping line with the vision of eventually transporting African Americans to Africa. But he also was convicted on mail fraud charges in 1923.

Tuesday Trivia: Congressional Campaign Edition
This week is all about Wyoming and Alaska

For this recess edition of trivia, we're going all congressional campaigns.

Should Liz Cheney win Tuesday’s congressional primary in Wyoming, she would be on track to become one of the few female members whose father also served in Congress (Dick Cheney was Wyoming’s at-large representative from 1979-89). Which of the following women did not have a father who served in Congress?

No Exposure to Asbestos From Separated Duct in Capitol Attic
Architect of the Capitol made repairs on Thursday

Air samples were found to be well below the regulatory limit for general space occupancy after the Architect of the Capitol discovered a separated duct in the attic of the Capitol.

On Thursday, the duct was identified and AOC shut off the air and evacuated the suites in the area served by the air handler, AOC spokeswoman Erin Courtney said. 

30 Locations to Visit This Weekend: Take the D.C. Walking Tour
Author takes you through sites you might have overlooked

If you can handle the D.C. summer heat, try walking the District to really see some of the nation’s capital that you might have been missing.

Barbara J. Saffir wrote “Walking Washington, D.C." to feature 30 D.C. locations you might not have thought to visit. The 30 treks on the tour are accessible by public transportation and Saffir gives directions from spot to spot.

Quiz: How Well Do You Know Washington?
Test your knowledge of the nation's capital
Obama Drops His Playlists for the Summer
The president is jamming to 'The Man' on vacation

It's summer vacation time for President Barack Obama and he took a break from golfing at Martha's Vineyard to remind America that he's pretty hip.

'Homicide in the House' Features a Spooky Shutdown Driven Capitol Hill
Colleen J. Shogan released her second of the "Washington Whodunit Series"

The fictional Kit Marshall is back with another Capitol Hill murder mystery to solve.

Readers were first introduced to Marshall in 2015, when Colleen J. Shogan, a senior executive at the Library of Congress, published the first book in her Washington Whodunit series, "Stabbing in the Senate."