Politics

Khanna Writing Internet Bill of Rights

By Eric Garcia
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Heard on the Hill

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?

By Alex Gangitano
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Politicians, often blessed with the gift of the gab, are rarely shy about sharing stories about how they got to where they are.

And some of them will be sharing their wisdom and inspiration at graduation ceremonies, beginning next month. Students wrapping up their college or graduate school experiences can expect to hear about following their dreams or — considering the number of Trump critics among the speakers — what not to do. 

Some members will speak to graduates at their alma maters, while others are visiting schools in their states or districts. A couple will be speaking to students at Harvard. 

Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., will speak at Radford University’s spring commencement on May 5. Kaine graduated from the University of Missouri and Harvard Law.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., will deliver the commencement address at the University of California, Berkeley on May 12. Harris graduated from Howard University and the UC Hastings College of the Law, but her parents met as grad students at Berkeley.

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., has two gigs this year on the same day. He will speak at Virginia State University’s afternoon commencement ceremony on May 12, and then give the keynote address at William & Mary. Warner graduated from George Washington University and Harvard Law.

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., will be the commencement speaker at Kean University, a public university in New Jersey, on May 17. Booker graduated from Stanford, Oxford and Yale.

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., who is not running for re-election this year, will speak at a ceremony at Harvard Law on May 23. Flake graduated from BYU with a master’s in political science.

Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez, D-Ill., who is retiring after this term, will deliver the commencement address at Northeastern Illinois University on May 7. He graduated from the university in 1975.

Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., will be the commencement speaker at the UCLA School of Law on May 11. Lieu graduated from Stanford and Georgetown Law.

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., will speak at the commencement at Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, on May 12. Meadows graduated from the University of South Florida.

Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., will give the keynote address at Rollins College’s Hamilton Holt School commencement ceremony on May 12. Murphy graduated from William & Mary and Georgetown.

Rep. Adam B. Schiff, D-Calif., will present the keynote speech at UC Hastings College of Law on May 12. Schiff graduated from Stanford and Harvard Law.

Rep. Niki Tsongas, D-Mass., who is retiring after this term, will speak at University of Massachusetts Lowell’s commencement on May 19. Tsongas graduated from Smith College and Boston University law school.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., will be the principal speaker at Harvard’s commencement on May 24. Lewis graduated from American Baptist Theological Seminary and Fisk University.

Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., will give the keynote address at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs commencement on June 15. Chu is a UCLA alumna, and earned her doctorate from the California School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles.

Watch: Pet Birds, Group Houses and Babies — Congressional Hits and Misses

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New Push for Senators to Pay Their Interns

By Alex Gangitano
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Heard on the Hill

Intern Success Story: How to Get Hired Right Away

By Alex Gangitano
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Heard on the Hill

Floor Charts for the Floor Show

By Alex Gangitano
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Bipartisan bills that aim to improve the government’s response to cybersecurity attacks on the electric grid advanced out of a House Energy and Commerce panel Wednesday. The action was the latest sign of heightened awareness on Capitol Hill that malicious hackers might be able to turn out the lights.

Four pieces of legislation — all focused on putting into statute coordination within the Department of Energy to prevent cyber attacks on the grid and other energy infrastructure — were advanced by the Energy Subcommittee by voice votes. The votes showed unusual unity on the often-partisan panel.

That divide was apparent, however, in the subcommittee vote on a measure to speed up the export of liquified natural gas from small-scale export facilities. That bill advanced along party lines, 19-14, as Democrats criticized the legislation as harmful to the environment. They also complained that the bill was an earmark for a Florida-based export project, the only pending facility that would meet the requirements. 

Recent high profile attempts by foreign actors, including groups linked with Russia, to probe nuclear facilities and pipeline control systems across the country since 2016 have raised awareness of committee members of the evolving cyber threat.

“As we’ve learned in classified briefings, and recently through the testimonies of Secretary Perry and our FERC Commissioners, cyber-attacks are a real and growing threat,” said Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., the chairman of the subcommittee, in a statement.

One of the security bills would codify a recent departmental reorganization announced by Energy Secretary Rick Perry in his fiscal 2019 budget request that creates a new assistant secretary position devoted to cybersecurity issues. The bill would ensure position remains part of department leadership in future administrations.

Two of the cyber bills would establish voluntary programs to encourage the private sector and the Energy Department to share research and cybersecurity implementation plans. The fourth bill requires the department to adopt pipeline and LNG export facility cybersecurity plans. 

“The four bipartisan cybersecurity bills before us today will enhance the Department of Energy’s efforts to strengthen the cybersecurity of our nation’s electricity grid and pipeline network,” said Rep. Frank Pallone Jr., D-N.J., the top Democrat of the full committee. “It is critical that we ensure our nation’s energy infrastructure is sufficiently protected from cyber threats.”

The bipartisan vibe evaporated with the small-scale LNG export bill. That legislation would streamline the approval process for small-scale facilities that support exports to the Caribbean, Central America and South America, defined as those that ship no more than 140 million cubic feet per day. 

Republican backers argued the measure would ensure speedy gas exports to Western Hemisphere nations, which they said would provide a steady energy supply that would burn cleaner compared to other fossil fuel sources — a benefit to carbon reduction goals.

“This should not be a partisan issue . . .  neither side of the aisle can deny that American small-scale LNG exports provides geopolitical, economic and environmental benefits,” said bill sponsor Rep. Bill Johnson, R-Ohio. 

Democrats complained that the bill’s requirements would essentially only apply to one facility owned by Houston-based Eagle LNG Partners Jacksonville LLC, according to the Congressional Research Service. That “sounds suspiciously like the kind of legislative earmark” Congress did away with, Pallone said. 

Democrats also said that by sidestepping some permits the bill would undermine environmental protections, more so than a separate Energy Department effort to hasten the pace of the permit reviews.

“In my opinion, that rule is already problematic, but this bill is even worse for the environment than the proposed rule,” Pallone said. 

Republicans promised to address Democrats’ concerns, but it remains to be seen how far that effort will extend.

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Politics

Schumer’s 4/20 Surprise

By Niels Lesniewski
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he would not be making floor time for legislation designed to shield Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III from firing.

McConnell’s determination that the action is not needed is apparently regardless of what happens in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“I don’t think he should fire Mueller, and I don’t think he’s going to,” the Kentucky Republican said. “So, this is a piece of legislation that’s not necessary in my judgement.”

“I’m the one who decides what we take to the floor. That’s my responsibility as the majority leader. We’ll not be having this on the floor of the Senate,” McConnell said during a Fox News interview.

Watch: The Status of Legislation to Protect Robert Mueller

The Judiciary Committee has a bipartisan bill on its agenda for Thursday’s markup, which may be held over for a week before consideration. Republicans and Democrats alike have expressed concern that President Donald Trump may seek to fire Mueller or Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

The measure being considered by the Senate committee is a hybrid of combines two separate proposals, each backed by Republicans and Democrats.

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Heard on the Hill

Meet the Dogs of the House, Round III

By Alex Gangitano
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Heard on the Hill

Meet the Dogs of the Senate, Round III

By Alex Gangitano
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