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Pelosi, Government Watchdogs Slam Ethics Committee Disclosure Change (Updated)

Pelosi is critical of new rules on House travel. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 2:58 p.m. |  Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is calling on the House Ethics Committee to reverse a change regarding travel disclosure requirements, characterizing the new rule as a step in the direction of less transparency.  

The statement came Tuesday afternoon, after a National Journal report  on a change to members' annual financial disclosure forms. Under the new guidance, members do not have to say on their yearly disclosure forms what trips they took and how much they cost.  

Members still have to get pre-approval from the Ethics Committee before taking privately funded trips, and they have to fill out a post-travel disclosure form 15 days after a trip; that information is available in searchable form on the House Clerk's website .  

But Pelosi said Tuesday that while the Ethics Committee seems to want to simplify the disclosure process, "Congress must always move in the direction of more disclosure, not less."  

"If the Ethics Committee does not act, then we will call upon the Speaker to allow a vote on legislation to reverse this decision," Pelosi said in her statement. "In the meantime, Members are encouraged to disclose such trips to both the Clerk and in their annual disclosures.”  

But Speaker John A. Boehner's staff didn't think Pelosi or her staff had done their research.  

A spokesman for Boehner, Michael Steel, said Pelosi's staff "needs to talk to her representative on the Ethics Committee, who signed off on this bipartisan change to reduce duplicative paperwork."  

In a rare public statement, the Ethics Committee staff director, Tom Rust, noted that members still needed prior approval from the Ethics Committee and still needed to file paperwork after the trip.  

"Neither of those requirements has been changed or diluted in any way," Rust said.  

He also noted that it was the Committee’s nonpartisan staff who recommended the change to the financial disclosure forms. "The Committee adopted these changes and publicly highlighted them on page 2 of the financial disclosure instructions, which were provided to all financial disclosure filers and posted on the Committee’s public web site months ago," Rust said. "The Committee is committed to effective and efficient public disclosure, and will continue to look for opportunities to improve the public filings required of Members and staff."  

But even before the Ethics Committee could defend itself, government watchdog groups were already having a field day with the new guidance.  

Melanie Sloan, the executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, called the change a "blatant attempt to avoid accountability."  

"The only Americans who would possibly be in favor of this change are members of Congress," Sloan said in a release.  

On the phone Tuesday, Sloan explained that she doesn't believe the clerk's office forms are as easily accessible as the financial disclosure forms. She also wasn't buying the explanation that the annual forms were duplicative and therefore unnecessary, noting in an ironic tone that, "there's never any duplication in the government."  

In 2007, the House mandated that members disclose their travel to the House clerk. Before that, the yearly report was the only official reporting mechanism available to the public.  

Part of the reasoning for the Ethics Committee change may have its roots in those House rules adopted in 2007. House Rule XXV states that these trips should be considered gifts to the House, not individual members.  

Still, Sloan wasn't buying the argument.  

"Whatever explanation they're giving, the point is to decrease the accountability for these trips," she said.