Obama Credits Democratic Unity for Debt Limit Victory

CAMBRIDGE, Md. — President Barack Obama credited House Democrats' party unity for getting Republican leaders to back off debt limit brinkmanship at the caucus's annual retreat here.  

"This caucus has shown, time and time again, under the most difficult circumstances, the kind of courage and unity and discipline that has made me very, very proud," Obama said on Friday morning.  

There's no better example, Obama said, than the vote to raise the debt ceiling earlier this week , which passed the House with all but two Democrats voting "yes" — and only 28 Republicans.  

"I was just talking to [Minority Leader] Nancy [Pelosi] before I came out here," he continued. "The fact that we are no longer going to see, I believe, anybody try to hold our government hostage and threaten the full faith and credit of the United States of America in order to contract policy concessions, the fact that we were able to pass a clean debt limit, is just one example of why, when you guys are unified, you guys stick together, this country is better off, and I could not be more proud."  

Obama's comments followed remarks by Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., who was originally slated to address the House Democratic Caucus on Thursday but had to reschedule due to inclement weather .  

While Biden delivered something of a pep talk to Democrats framed in the context of the 2014 election cycle, Obama steered clear of such rhetoric; in fact, he made no mention at all of the November elections.  

But Obama did energize the crowd of lawmakers assembled in a Hyatt Regency ballroom on Friday morning by promising to continue to sign executive orders on specific policy issues on which House Republican refused to budge.  

"I want to work with Congress, but I'm not gonna wait, because there's too much to do," he said.  

Obama conceded that there are some areas in which he could not enact change through his now-infamous "pen and phone" strategy, such as an overhaul of the nation's immigration system and an increase in the minimum wage across all work sectors.  

In those areas, Democrats would have to show resilience on their own.  

"Punting and putting things off for another year, another two years, another three years, it hurts people, it hurts our economies, it hurts families and part of what I like to think makes us Democrats is not simply some abstract ideological set of beliefs but the fact that we're reminded every single day that we're here to help a whole bunch of folks out there, our neighbors, our communities who are struggling still and need our help and they're counting on us," Obama said.  

"Good thing is, they got some outstanding members of Congress who are willing to fight for them," he continued, "regardless of the political costs."